policymic:

There’s 6,300 tonnes of space junk orbiting Earth — Astonishing interactive visualizations
Follow policymic

I presented the idea of cylindrical matter expulsion device which was steered by rotational torque to my science teacher in high school and she told me I was on to something. But NASA’s hard to get a hold of.

policymic:

There’s 6,300 tonnes of space junk orbiting Earth — Astonishing interactive visualizations

Follow policymic

I presented the idea of cylindrical matter expulsion device which was steered by rotational torque to my science teacher in high school and she told me I was on to something. But NASA’s hard to get a hold of.

(via newsweek)

I have this idea for a Sherlock Holmesian video game.

For the fight sequences, you do what Sherlock does and choose your movies in advance based on what you expect your opponent to do. And as you play more you get the order correct more and more. The end.

The easiest way to prevent this from happening would be to have a slight incline for the truck.

The easiest way to prevent this from happening would be to have a slight incline for the truck.

(via nippl3r-deactivated20140205)

thedailywhat:

What If? U.S. Currency of the Day:Dowling Duncan’s submission to Richard Smith’s ongoing Dollar ReDe$ign Project combines a vertical format with varied bill sizes and facts about American history and culture.
While the bills are aesthetically pleasing, don’t most of us use plastic anyway?
The rest of the submissions can be found here.
[npr]

I have several things to say about this…
There’s nothing here to help the blind. Sure the different sizes are good, but only when you have something to compare them to. They need to have their numbers embellished so that they can be felt.
The colors are horrible in my opinion. People are used to green money, and that’s how it should stay. Maybe go with some different shades of green, with darkest being the largest amount.
These are some terrible image choices. The money looks cluttered and busy. I really liked having the monuments on the money, and this way we can add new ones like the (soon-to-be-decommisioned) Washington Monument (fuck-you-I’ll-be-here-forever) Grand Canyon.
The money should be vertical on one side and horizontal on the other. Get the best of both worlds.

thedailywhat:

What If? U.S. Currency of the Day:Dowling Duncan’s submission to Richard Smith’s ongoing Dollar ReDe$ign Project combines a vertical format with varied bill sizes and facts about American history and culture.

While the bills are aesthetically pleasing, don’t most of us use plastic anyway?

The rest of the submissions can be found here.

[npr]

I have several things to say about this…

  1. There’s nothing here to help the blind. Sure the different sizes are good, but only when you have something to compare them to. They need to have their numbers embellished so that they can be felt.
  2. The colors are horrible in my opinion. People are used to green money, and that’s how it should stay. Maybe go with some different shades of green, with darkest being the largest amount.
  3. These are some terrible image choices. The money looks cluttered and busy. I really liked having the monuments on the money, and this way we can add new ones like the (soon-to-be-decommisioned) Washington Monument (fuck-you-I’ll-be-here-forever) Grand Canyon.
  4. The money should be vertical on one side and horizontal on the other. Get the best of both worlds.

ilovecharts:

analog infographics made with arduino, processing

This makes no sense to me. But I’d like to see a spinning machine that displays pie charts.

Sometimes before I go to bed I think a lot. And last night, one of the things that came to mind was this picture. It apparently shows a foolproof way to cheat the US postal service. (And other postal services I assume.) Now, I know little about the system, but I know enough to think that this is either possible or at least partially passable. But I’m a problem fixer myself.
I believe that I’ve figured out a way to make sure that this doesn’t happen again. All the postal service has to do is stamp mail with the originating zip code or office number. That way if you’re in California and you’re trying to mail a package to Washington, D.C. for free, it’ll get stopped before it even leaves the state. It’s not as easy as just adding an extra ink stamp though, because those are pretty easy to duplicate. It might have to be a “QR code”-like sticker or something like that. Something one doesn’t come by easily. Or if it must be an ink stamp, perhaps it can be on anti-fraudulent paper or the like.
Anyways, that’s my suggestion. Feel free to tear it apart if you must.

Sometimes before I go to bed I think a lot. And last night, one of the things that came to mind was this picture. It apparently shows a foolproof way to cheat the US postal service. (And other postal services I assume.) Now, I know little about the system, but I know enough to think that this is either possible or at least partially passable. But I’m a problem fixer myself.

I believe that I’ve figured out a way to make sure that this doesn’t happen again. All the postal service has to do is stamp mail with the originating zip code or office number. That way if you’re in California and you’re trying to mail a package to Washington, D.C. for free, it’ll get stopped before it even leaves the state. It’s not as easy as just adding an extra ink stamp though, because those are pretty easy to duplicate. It might have to be a “QR code”-like sticker or something like that. Something one doesn’t come by easily. Or if it must be an ink stamp, perhaps it can be on anti-fraudulent paper or the like.

Anyways, that’s my suggestion. Feel free to tear it apart if you must.